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in the ranks of leadership of a civil rights group called the african national congress, the a.n.c. >> they were the revolutionaries of their day. they were the wild young men. >> teichner: former "time" magazine editor rick stengel spent countless hours in private conversation with mandela while collaborating on mandela's autobiography. >> mandela went to johannesburg as a young man and was treated in the terrible way that young black men were treated in the 1950s. i think this had a huge effect on him. >> teichner: mandela was in the forefront of growing resistance by the a.n.c., which began to protest the hated laws requiring blacks to carry passes, restricting where they could go. then, a galvanizing moment caught the world's attention. on march 21, 1960, in sharpeville, the peaceful civil rights movement was pierced with bullets. ( gunfire ) walter cronkite reported. >> police mounted on tanks opened fire. 69 natives were killed, 176 wounded. most of the victims were shot in the back. >> teichner: it was against this blood-red backdrop that nelson mandela took up arms. >>
john lewis, democrat of georgia and civil rights leader. mr. lewis, thank you for being with us here tonight on this historic day. >> thank you very much, rachel, for having me, and thank you nar rich history, telling the story, what happened and how it happened. it is very moving. >> i have to ask, after your long career, especially as a young man in the south, in the american civil rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work inform your own? what has he meant to you over the years? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> well, the leadership, the vision, the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said, if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle and when i met him for the first time. he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what
>>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world wakes to news of a giant of human and civil rights gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for forever changing history. >> she spent nearly three decades in prison, becoming the first black president in south africa. father figure to millions around the globe. >> people around the world are remembering nelson mandela, a symbol of forbearance, peace and dignity. we have pictures from south africa, where pe
in the civil rights and started hearing about what's going on in south africa, some of the leaders of sclc and others would go. it was considered a terrorist far left kind of course. and it was shunned. people would not discuss it in proper mainstream politics. and mandela was considered somebody who was an extreme cause that was in jail and you would see after awhile it evolved into a movement. but it was -- if it had not been for the randall robinsons and the maxine waters and the others that paid a price that built up a movement, a movement of civil disobedience long before it became a cause and started pushing for sanctions and getting artisan athletes to boycott. had it not been because of that movement, it never would have became the movement it was in the united states. >> the national credibility that was lent to it by having those names you mentioned. and charlayne, as you have covered as a journalist, as an activist, you have known nelson mandela since he has been out of prison. and we know that experience certainly like it would for anybody, it changed him. what people don't und
-racist, non-sexist country which certainly has a compatible legacy in our country's dr. king and civil rights movement here, which it's interesting there was a symbiosis between the civil rights movement and south african movement, they took a tremendous amount of inspiration from dr. king in the civil rights movement in the united states, if you think about 196 3, he went to prison in 1964. >> there is no doubt which gets me to the next question from professor ogletree, in terms of the impact that the anti parti movement around the world had and here in the united states had on the end of a paratide, how significant was it? >> it was very significant. remember, anderson, this was during the regan administration and ronald reagan opposed what we were doing and have towed issues to talk about opening up the system in south africa to end the partide. thousands of people got arrested in washington d.c. and i got a group of lawyers together to represent them for nothing. they were released and not charged with an offense. it was a national issue, black, white, male, female, people on the left, ri
. >> nelson mandela's life work extended behind the native south africa. we sat with civil rights leader the reverend jessie jackson, and he drew parallels with his movement and the struggle in the u.s. >> there was a sameness about the struggle there and here. both faced persecution in 1953. king was gaoled and bricked and stabbed at 39. nelson mandela was gaoled and put on the terrorist list by the u.s. government and emerged as a moral authority, both have that moral character. barack obama on the other hand - he was the ben factor of the struggles. he's a generation behind. >> nelson mandela and the king were transformative figures. >> we saw a picture of you and nelson mandela with one of my colleagues, morgan radford, who got the chance to meet nelson mandela for the first time. tell me about the man you knew. >> i must say when i was in cape down south africa, he was released. immediately he recognised me and called my name. i was overwhelmed. he knew it was going on. he was current, alive and alert. he didn't just read the speech that day, he wrote it. he also was a great debater
. >>> four u.s. presidents are headed to south africa to pay final respects to civil rights legend nelson mandela. president obama and first lady michelle obama departed on air force one just a short time ago. tomorrow's memorial service will also serve as a rare reunion for nearly all of the living american presidents. >>> kpix5cate courigan is in the news room. a real security challenge. >> reporter: 8000 mourners are expected to attend the memorial and authorities say thousands of police officers will be on hand. right now, a memorial outside of mandela's former home is growing as well as a crowd of south africa's that have come together since the death. >> police are preparing today for a memorial service for nelson mandela at a johannesburg soccer stadium. president obama leaves this morning for south africa where he'll attend the massive public memorial. former president's bush, clinton and carter will also be in attendance along with more than 50 heads of state, making it one of the largest gatherings of world leaders in recent history. >> this is a test for us. >> reporter: the he
's incomparable. one of us that grew up in the post-civil rights era it tempered a lot of us that got to know him. the mandela way was not only to fight for change but become the change and he symbolized that in epic proportions. few times i was honored to be around him, you were always moved by this balance of gravity and humility, you never saw in anyone else. he was such a humble and great guy at the same time. it is really something that we probably, president obama said, we'll never see again. >> john meacham, i was talking to my 10-year-old girl about nelson mandela, explaining about him, what he had done, the sacrifices he made, the way he changed this country and the world. i'm wondering, though, of course, my 10-year-old girl didn't know an awful lot about nelson mandela. and we won't even talk about my 5-year-old boy. he'll get it in years to come. what do history books write about this man? >> the last lines of the 20th century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him t
that will nelson mandela set. >> want to bring in andrew young, civil rights leader and former ambassador to the united nations. welcome, as well as james joseph, former u.s. ambassador to south africa and duke university professor, both of who new mandela very well on a personal level. ambassador, i'd like to start with you. you draw parallels. you talk about how this was so important, so significant in some ways to the civil rights movement and the struggle at the time. for us, i was a college student when we had a lot of those divest from the from the south africa shantytowns in the yards of the campuses. tell us the connected you had with the civil rights movement. >> understood that as dr. king said, injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. and so we knew of chief albert la tooley and the african national crisis. we entertained oliver tambo and mbeki when they were in exile. but my first real conflict, i went to south africa with arthur ashe in 1974 to play tennis. we tried to seaman della and didn't but we saw robert subuqwai who had just gotten out of jail and we start
among some of the biggest civil right ises advocates. brown hosted him in his civil rights tour after he got out of prison. >> mandela came here in 1990, and 70,000 packed into the coliseum to see their hero and receive thanks for his activism. >> it is you, the people of the bay area, who have given me and my dedication hopes to continue to prosper. >> the bay area choir who performed for him in south africa
president. you looking at the scene. a man who became a towering symbol for civil rights for strength, for unity. >> days to come, we will bring you extensive coverage, detailed coverage of his life, president obama spoke about mandela minutes after his death was announced, here is what he said. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us to be the example he set, to make decisions guarded not by haste, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make. strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> . >> right now let's pause and give thanks the r the fact that nelson mandela lived, a pan who took history, in his hands. bent the arc of the moral universes towards justice, may god bless his memory, and keep him at peace. >> the president of the united states, again, live pictures in outside nelson mandela's home tonight, and here in new york, a live picture of the apollo theater, the same the venue in harlem, tonight the marque honors nelson mandela. here is a picture of the marque, we are getting ready for a live shot. we h
is a key player in the civil rights movement. jenna was an inspiration to end users importantly this morning to get a tree. as for the basic colors. nichole. which even the least arguable that you can overcome any obstacles that anyone rushing off to bible cause of the checks dentist told us all montana's is it. and the cement that was coming he really. he was lying. i just felt really very proud to be havin guy to be an african american to be decades before the anti apartheid. i checked his pulse to toe with steve johnson says he will continue to preach about this is done for monday. these rates move continued to my earn more and more and more about twelve we used to symbolize to try it on monday as nineteen ninety four visits. he came back to holland began to show solidarity. can americans once again produced. i would stick to it now and how people are reacting on the internet to mandela isn't that an event run by shannon bennett ran on china but every scene. well i feel are taking to twitter especially this painting daily list of reactions than on basically every minute burie
for freedom. the music moved and motivated an embattled people. our civil rights movement had its music, but, in south africa, hundreds of songs rang out. >> ( singing "nanku" ) >> marsalis: "nanku," recorded by mariam makeba, kept alive the spirit of mandela and others locked up on robben island. >> the nation's feelings when those guys were all in jail was how much they missed them. ( sings "nangue" ) and it says they are all rotting in jail. while we need them here, they are all rotting in jail. >> ♪ nan gue nanque nangue, mandela oh, my africa. ♪ >> you know, nobody had seen him since the 1960s. by the '80s, you were not allowed to say his name in south africa. ♪ >> marsalis: in the mid 1980s, hugh was far from home, making music in botswana when nelson mandela reached out to him. in 1985, he was still incarcerated. he took the time to write you a letter on your birthday. >> he just had this letter smuggled out of prison. here's a guy who's been in jail for 20 years, but he's writing to me, giving me encouragement. i just stood there and said, "wow," and i then went to the piano an
as director of the southern africa project of the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. douglas foster is the author of "after mandela: the struggle for freedom in post-apartheid south africa." he's an associate professor at northwestern university's medill school of journalism. donald gibb and john stremlau is vice president for peace programs at the carter center. he taught at the university of the witwatersrand in johannesburg. >> welcome to you mcdour first reaction tonight on hearing of the loss of nelson mandela? >> well, i'm terribly sad.of co. we knew it was coming. but nevertheless, it is a shock. and it's quite sad thing. i think first of all, the people of south africa who would be mourning in a very special way, but i think all around the world has lost a hero, a hero that we desperately needed, when he came forward and faif us hope. >> -- gave us hope. >> as we continue thisconversat. we do want to say to local stations that we are not going to be taking a break tonight so we can continue to discuss nelson mandela's life and legacy. and i want to pick up with you p
to draw profound parallels between our civil rights movement and what they experienced in south africa years ago. >> caller: of course, there's a common thread that is overlooked. gandy went to india. he began movements to south africa. dr. king oftentimes cited ghandi as his exemplary so did mandela. when you speak of the american movement and south africa, there's a common theme. so, there is an intellectual, spiritual relationship. clearly, the movement in south africa was one in which all of the resources of the state were placed against mr. mandela and his movement. in this country, we had our own challenges, of course, coming out of slavery. our civil war, there were places of refuge. during the civil war, there were places of refuge in this country, there were none in south africa. many had to flee and go elsewhere. mr. mandela chose not to flee and go elsewhere. he spent 27 years in prison. >> interestingly, too, martin luther king made an impact while living, but one could argue he's made a greater impact since he has been gone. nelson mandela made the impact while he was stil
't remember much about the civil rights movement don't remember much about his life. they know what he stood for. i think, you know, today in south africa, even when people wake up in the morning because most people don't know he's transitioned and i use that word because in south africa, people don't talk about death and dying. they talk about transitioning and it's a happy time, and i'm sure they're going to be celebrating his life. i hope they will be teaching, teaching, teaching what nelson mandela stood for. this is a moment to teach. it's a teachable moment. as much as it is a moment to reflect and think about what nelson mandela has meant to the world and to these young people who can sing in that neighborhood where they used to not even be able to go without a pass, the black ones. it's that kind of thing that nelson mandela did away with that we need to remember. those young people could not have gone into that neighborhood a this time of night without a pass before nelson mandela and his people liberated the country. so that's what they're, you know, representing now. >> charlayne,
the context in which he lived. you had the inverse in the civil rights movement. you had a native african population that was seven times larger than the ruling class that essentially turned them and enslaved them in their own country. they were made a third-class citizen, a noncitizen, a nonperson within a land that they called their ancestoral home and they tried to fight apartheid and oppression in certain ways, sometimes through revolutionary struggle, violent struggle. they would try nonviolence and they would be met with incredible, intense violence. the amount of violence that it took to suppress this large african population was incredible. so what mandela for gave is something that is almost indescribable for most people and i think for a lot of african-americans, this was the struggle for a lot of campuses that came after the generation of vietnam. so you have the civil rights struggle, which was the 1960s, the big young people's revolution. then you had the fight against vietnam. but for a lot of people, particularly in the 1980s, it was this. it was the fight against apartheid
as a memorial, cars and candles in honor of the civil rights leader and politician who passed away at the aim -- age of 95. >> republican to's embattled mayor is criticizing president obama. mayor ford is denowing the health care laissezzing affordable care -- saying affordable care act is too expensive in spite of california having a government-run health care system. as a person, he said, i live but i don't like his policies. >> if you are looking for a perfect gift, california officials have a suggestion, health insurance. the sack -- "sacramento bee" says "give the gift of health aimed at mothers and grandmothers would could look to buy health insurance for uninsured young adults. >> some are sounding off as a new baby bouncy seat with an ipad holder. the company released this video showing how it works. they are selling the app for $80 and says it offers play and learning at a baby's fingertips but some are disgusted. shoppers on amazon have called it "one of the worst ideas for baby products." >> amazon is widely expected to lunch a new delivery service next week for groceries. all sign
brazile is here, nelson mandela, the civil rights movement in the united states, what was going on in south africa, you and i are old enough to remember those days, the role and as christiane accurately points out, that all of us played in trying to move south africa in a better direction. you remember those days very vividly. >> well, the apartheid regime was a brutal regime. it was a violent regime. and the goal of folks in america, especially young people, was to educate, was to mobilize and to get more sanctions, to get corporations doing business in south africa to put pressure on the south african government. clearly it worked, because after years and years of struggle, finally in 1990, we broke the apartheid regime but it was a long and brutal struggle. >> here's a picture, take a look at this. >>> give us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south afri
his long struggle in the hospital since june and before has come to an end. the iconic civil rights leader and former president of south africa, nelson mandela, is dead today at 95. fox news new york continuing coverage on fox news channel, satellite and cable, more coverage later on your late local news. we continue our coverage on fox news channel across the country and around the world. the death of nelson mandela is not unexpected. we are looking at live pick ktu outside the hospital and near his home. south africa has a week long remembrance planned for him planned well in advance and will be announced by the government shortly is my understanding. we're anticipating we'll hear further from the president at some point. chris matthews is scheduled to interview him today. i believe that was scheduled to be live as part of a college tour. we'll have access to that. we're waiting for word from the white house. nelson mandela a friend to folks around the world. as we wait for further news, i can tell you the associate press puts it, he became one of the world's most beloved statesm
influenced civil rights leaders here and his complicated relationship with the united states. >>> also at this hour, on the record right now, president obama is wrapping up remarks about israel during a time of tension over iran. these are some live pictures. the president literally just wrapping up. more from the white house. >>> and the budget breakthrough, a rare bipartisan plan is in the works right now. i'll ask a gop congresswoman if they'll make deadline day. >>> there will be a lot of friendships made and other kids will have a friend to play with. >> and the buddy bench. one second-grader's idea to solve loneliness is today's big idea. a lot to get to. >>> we start this hour with the release of 85-year-old american veteran merrill newman. newman arrived at san francisco international airport about two hours ago to applause. he was holding his wife's hand. the north korean government released newman late last night. they'd been holding him in the country since october. as you might imagine, newman says he is thrilled to be home. >> it's been a great homecoming. and i'm tired bu
-in with congressman walter fauntroy and civil rights leader mary frances berry at the south african embassy in washington, d.c they told the ambassador that they would not leave until their demands were met. >> first was the immediate release of nelson mandela from prison. the second demand was that all of the black political prisoners be released. and thirdly that they begin immediately the dismantlement of the apartheid system. >> reporter: all three were jailed. that one act of civil disobedience led to a year of daily protests at the embassy where celebrities, members of congress, and citizens were also arrested. >> we put 5,000 people in jail at the embassy and that drove the headlines. >> free south africa! >> reporter: the movement pressured politicians to act. >> on this vote -- >> reporter: and in 1986 congress overroad president reagan's veto and imposed trade sanctions against south africa. u.s. businesses were forced to divest, costing the regime over $350 million that year alone. four years later, mandela was free. >> nelson mandela taking his first steps into a new south afric
. >> reporter: civil rights lawyer george bizos was mandela's attorney and friend. >> he was an example to the people of south africa, to the people of africa, to the people of the world as to how authorities is to be exercised. >> reporter: almost 60 heads of state including president barack obama and most of the living former u.s. presidents will attend mandela's memorial and funeral services this week. from a massive ceremony at a johannesburg stadium tuesday to lying in state in the capitol pretoria to burial next sunday in his ancestral village in the eastern cape province, it's expected to be one of the largest global gatherings in recent history. >>> you say 11,000 -- >> 11,000 troops have been deployed. >> reporter: defense minister nosiviwe mapisa-nqakula is overseeing security. she says soldier, the air force, national and city police all are being deployed to control and protect tens of thousands of mourners. >> this is a test for us. and we know that and believe that people will be watching how south africa perform. >> today a south african's pray, they also worry, the show
nuclear negotiations and the syrian civil war. let's bring in washington right now. the president spoke about several issues to this group of israeli leaders and u.s. leaders. were they comfortable with his answers about iran and the recent deal to curtail iran's nuclear program? >> well, in some ways, fred, i think he said exactly what the audience wanted to hear in terms of the fact that no option is off the table. he said he wasn't sure if this agreement with iran was going to work, but if it didn't, he would still keep that military option on the take. but he also laid out some very strong red lines for a possible deal with iran. let's take a listen to what he had to say about the need for everyone to be realistic about what's possible. >> one can envision an ideal world in which iran said, we'll destroy every element and facility and you name it, it's all gone. i can envision a world in which congress passed every one of my bills that i put forward. i mean, there are a lot of things that i can envision that would be wonderful. but precisely because we don't trust the nature of the
at it as almost a proxy for what had happened in america during the civil rights movement and i think it awakened and it was a revelation for many, many americans. >> i'm sure president obama and i'm sure you'll agree was deeply disappointed when he was in south africa earlier this year, with his family, he was not able to go and meet president mandela, because he was so gravely ill. i'm sure he would have loved to have done that, but he obviously couldn't. he'll head to south africa in the coming days for the funeral, this will be an important event not only for president obama but for the united states. >> yes, and again, wolf, mandela has not been himself for a number of years. i think it was understandable he wasn't able to meet with the president. mandela say man of such great pride. the last few years when his memory was failing him, he felt awkward, seeing people, but i do think it's a great opportunity for president obama, president obama has had an important and deep focus on africa, the young african leaders initiative that he started as something that he cares a great deal about, so i
who became a towering symbol for civil rights for strength, for unity.
. the president and iconic champion of civil rights died thursday age 95 after years of illness. he was at his home in johannesburg surrounded by family. south african president jacob zuma said our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. mandela's hospital has been moved. this is the scene right outside mandela's home there in johannesburg in the out market neighborhood. you can see right now people are laying flowers and to bring tribute to the man widely seen as the father of modern south africa. he was president for five years. he stepped down, has not been president for 14 years but remains very much in the heart of so many people there. this news came later than night south african time and so right now as this country wakes up, 34 minutes past 8:00, many people are learning nelson mandela is at rest. >> and, of course, mandela accomplished so many great things. he was the father of a nation. he led south africa through its battle against oppression and on to democracy and it kept him away from home. he also stayed very close to his family as we've mentioned our r
. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the presence that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer pour and reconcile for those who jailed him set an example that all humanity took inspire to whether the lives of nation
civil rights movement and after the vietnam war movement, college campuses in the 80s erupted over the apartheid movement. the administration of ronald reagan finally was the first veto override on foreign policy. it was rejected and taken over as jim baker said on "morning joe." taken over by congress. >> why do you think the world was slow when it came to dealing with south africa? >> i have to say that we in the media are partly to blame. we didn't focus that much on what was going on in south africa. until it just became impossible to ignore. when i went the first time in 1985, it was actually the first time that we focused on the people of south africa. both the black and the white and what the human beings of the country were thinking. why the white people thought they were superior to the blacks and did they ever see an end to that thinking? how the blacks were struggling on every level, not just in the streets, but offices where many of them worked. it was initially focusing on the overall idea of those who are fighting against oppression and those who are pressing. we didn
of nelson mandela. >> the civil rights icon has 17 grandchildren, some of whom opened up in a rare interview with abc's rina ninan. >> reporter: set free after 27 years in prison. >> first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: some of his grandchildren found themselves longing for his prison days. >> those days i cherished because it was just the two of no one else. when he came out we did not have him because he had bigger issues to tackle. >> reporter: his grandson remembers visiting him when he was 4. >> he asked the wardens if he could put cartoons on the tv so me and my other cousins could sit and watch them and he offered us hot chocolate and he made it himself. >> reporter: his granddaughter said that while he couldn't physically touch them, his words always did. >> at the end of the visit he brought me a box of chocolates saying your visit will always be a bittersweet memory for me. >> reporter: words in the form of letters written to the family from jail. this one describing the moment that he was told his son was killed in a car accident. >> it describes his heart seems to st
. stateside, a yuounger generatio of american civil rights leaders is reflecting on the legacy of the man and how he inspired them. one of them downing me now from washington, d.c. former president and ceo of the naacp, ben jellis. i'd like to know when nelson mandela first got on your radar. what was the first context in which you learned about him and when you first saw him in person. >> you know, the first conversation was with my mom explaining to me why we couldn't drink coke and we couldn't get gas from the shell station and really talking about how similar the struggle that was happening then in south africa was to what she had gone through as a young person in this country. the first time i saw him was he was doing a tour when he got out of prison. it was 1989. he came to the coliseum in the east bay. i and tens of thousands of people were all gathered there. i recall pushing my way up to the front. you know, for us, we were used to having black leaders assassinated in their prime and spending the rest of our lives wondering what could have been, what would have been. and with him
. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them first. >>> in the united states our country's leaders past and present. we heard from president obama last night. let's go to the white house now and hear from brianna keilar. this was a personal moment for barack obama who talked about the influence of nelson mandela when he was a young man. >> reporter: tha
with transforming a country out of apartheid and considered one of the great civil rights leaders. tributes to him are coming in many forms. the white house flag will fly at half-staff through mon. last night they were half-staff at the state capital. here in california in sacramento. california was one of the leaders of the movement and discouraged people from investing in south africa. nelson mandela is trending. a group of pilot whales stranded in the everglades in florida back at sea also trending. lebron james co-starring with kevin hart in a comedy. and tgif, thank god it's friday. and winter storm across the country people are waking up to bitter cold. and you can follow us anytime at #cbssf. >>> cold snow and ice is the weather plaguing the country now from the lone star state to lake erie millions of people are in a deep freeze. as marlie hall reports the weather is brutal and dangerous dangerous. >>> reporter: people are scraping ice off their cars as freezing rain falls across parts of texas. a layer of slush and ice is making the roads dangerous. it's all part of a wintry blast that's
of the most influential leaders and revolutionaries. along with our own civil rights leader dr. martin luther king, junior. among others on the list, presidents theodore roosevelt and ronald reagan, winston churchill and margaret thatcher, pope john paul ii and israel's first prime minister david bengoria. adolph hitler and mao. "time" went on to name the last century's three greatest people. >> the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> osgood: runner up for franklin d. roosevelt and muhammad gandhi who led india's campaign against british colonialism. >> it is complete independence that we want. >> ghandi inspired among many others, nelson mandela who praised him in an essay for "time." growth ghandi and i suffered colonial oppression, and both of us mobilized our respected peoples against government, is that violated our freedoms. when it came to choosing the greatest figure of the 20th century, "time" looked beyond politics to choose albert einstein, the scientist who derived the equation e equals mc squared. a choice defended by walter isaacson. >> he said politics is for the mome
in the civil rights struggle against apartheid i think makes it very meaningful. his presence will be significant. >> when it comes to president obama's presence on the international stage, we know he's talking about this potential for comprehensive agreement with iran yesterday. he said it's 50/50 or, frankly, it could be worse. his approval numbers very low here. when it comes to the international stage, how is his capital right now? >> i don't think it's exceedingly high. i think a lot of america's allies, particularly in the middle east from israel to some of the gulf countries think america has lost its nerve in some regard, particularly when it comes to confronting iran. so i think there is some difficulty with ourbili because our economic standing has some impact as well. it doesn't diminish america's overall power in the world and america's real influence in the world. that is still very, very strong, even if some people have doubts about president obama. >> how much of a focus is there for president obama in terms of international, seg tear hagel making his way to afg
of politicians, celebrities, civil rights leaders and others who are arriving in south africa to pay their respects to nelson mandela but only a select few got to hitch a ride with the president, including one guy who sat in that big chair before. the ex-presidents club has been called the most exclusive one in the world and they have been depicted as a super group of super heroes by "snl" but what happens in reality when you're stuck on a 19 hour flight with someone who has spent years repudiating everything you stand for? well, actually, it can mean beautiful things. the world is quickly preparing for what may be the largest gathering of heads of state since winston churchill's funeral in 1965. representing the u.s. alone will be presidents barack obama, george w. bush, bill clinton and jimmy carter. comprising one of the most prestigious frequent flyer clubs in the world. today, air force one departed for south africa, where more than 90 world leaders are planning to attend nelson mandela's memorial tuesday in johannesburg. inside air force one, the obamas and george w. and laura
family has filed a federal civil rights lawsuit. this as the police department continues to investigate exactly what happened. its findings will be turned over to the district attorney and the district attorney will decide whether a crime was committed. alex savidge, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> later today, the senate is expected to vote on whether to renew a ban on plastic guns that can evade metal detectors. the 25-year-old ban is due to expire at midnight. today's vote is on extending the ban for ten more years. last week, the house voted to approve the extension. >>> the main library is increasing security after a string of problems after a recent attack. in september, a 61-year-old man was hit in the head by a chair while using a library computer. there have been complaints about bathroom conditions, people using drugs and found sleeping in the library. in response, the library plans to higher more security guards and cuss toldian and increase -- custodians and increase the hours of the part-time employee. >>> state and local lawmakers are scheduled to attend a conference today on the
think that it's a violation of the law. we have to balance our security with a respect for civil rights and our constitution, which has made america different. and what the nsa has done with the administration's concurrence simply does the security route and forgets about the civil liberties and constitutional laws. heather: you put together this freedom act that you see you say is different. how is that? >> it restricts who the nsa can collect information from, specifically the bull collection of records by the nsa. it's as simple as that. heather: you are also calling for civilians to be in charge. what difference do you think that will make? >> the military does a good job, but their job is to protect the security of the united states and forget about the constitutional concerns and i think that having someone without a military background as well as being a national director of intelligence, that would bring the proper balance in determining what to ask the court to approve and how to go about collecting this information. and i can say thoroughly that we do need to have a properly a
, this is not right, this cannot stand, we couldn't advance civil rights at home and go through all that we went through, including the martyrdom of martin luther king, who clearly, like gandhi, like mandela, was inspired by gandhi, and not stick up for south africa. >> and you did indeed. he was grateful to you for that. was there one piece of advice that he gave you that really sticks out in your mind? >> yes. when he told me -- he basically was saying, you know if you're in public life and you have public responsibilities, you cannot be free and effective unless you have no personal feelings of anger. he said, you know, you have to -- you have to never give up your mind and heart. it requires a mental and emotional discipline to live in the present and the future, and keep an open door and open mind and an open heart to everyone. i remember one day, oh, about a month after the whole impeachment business was over, henry hyde, who had run the whole show, unbelievably enough, maybe a few months after, it was shortly after, asked for a meeting at the white house, for something that he was interes
of so much history, working with civil rights leaders like reverend jesse jackson, corretja scott king and eleanor holmes norton. mary frann sis berry, the former commissioner of the civil rights commission, eeoc and robinson would transafrica. i was a kid during those days. they were organizing protests outside the south african embassy. my job was to help find and identify people who would get arrested, to keep the movement alive. it was a very tremendous moment and opportunity, but later i had an opportunity, working on a clinton/gore campaign and nelson mandela after visiting harlem in the 1990s, wanted to come to the inaugural of bill clinton. he had great affection and respect and admiration for bill and hillary clinton. i was an advanced person back during those days. i helped to escort him around. my good friend, yolanda, who was in that picture, it was a great moment. later i had an opportunity to go to south africa and other places to help train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know
and the british refer to as "the riot on king street"? >> all right, i know fort sumter was the civil war, and the alamo was somewhere down in texas, and texas wasn't around during the revolutionary war, i don't think, so the burning of washington and the boston massacre. name that shifts the blame. all right, i'm gonna go with... jumping the question 'cause i'm not sure. >> it's my boo. >> [laughter] >> you gonna hit me with my whole move. i was all like, "what are you gonna do? oh, you gonna jump the question." so you jumped over. not really sure, decided to jump over it. >> not really sure, yeah. >> all right, it is now out of play. you thinkin' it was possibly "b," 'cause that's the one you would have, if you would have guessed. >> yes, if i would have guessed. >> what is the correct answer? it is indeed "b," the boston massacre. again, it's double money week. hopefully this money is small. what'd she jump over? oh, well, jumped over $1,000. that's all right. when we come back, clarice is going for her double money question. millionaire in just a second. it's so much more than coffee.
life. >> reporter: president obama paid homage to a civil rights icon. >> let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the mark of the moral universe toward justice. >> reporter: queen elizabeth remembered his efforts. his legacy is the peaceful south africa we see today, she said. a glittering film premiere in london attended by the royal couple and two of mandela's daughters celebrated the movie of his life, "long walk to freedom." his death was announced as the credits rolled. >> extremely tragic news. we are just reminded what an extraordinary man he was. >> reporter: mandela will have a state funeral but it was his leading by example that helped so many. >> we lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings any of us will share time with here on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> reporter: this country is now in an official state of mourning. his body will lie in state for viewing and a funeral is expected. matt, back to you. >> richard, thanks so muc
to know about american politics. fascinated by the american civil rights movement. martha: i think that is such an important point that you make about him and he was, he was sort of regal. he had a very regal bearing and yet he was humble which is such a great combination. >> awesome. i was remembering that when he came to the 50th anniversary of the united nations opening in new york, all the world leaders were around obviously and yet somehow mandela stood out as a leader among leaders because they all flocked to him. they all wanted photos with him shaking hands. i got to go over, i was like, it was unbelievable that the world leaders were almost like, tell us your secret. how did you do this? martha: yeah. and think one of the secrets was that he put everything before himself and that he was such a strong man and who was able to be, you know, in the face of that moment, was able to bring people together, much the way abraham lincoln did during the civil war period in the united states, to wrench the two sides back together for belief in a greater nation. >> wow, that was terrif
. >> reporter: i want to get your thoughts as someone who has walked among civil rights giants and nelson mandela, and martin luther king. how aware were the two of them aware to their roles in the struggles? >> dr. king went to jail in '63 and so did nelson mandela. dr. king in his address referenced the struggle in south africa. the kinship from the american corporations and south africa and our government that was a part of it. also the things that we did here enabled mandela's freedom. for example, the '65 riots act that changed the course in this country. blacks could vote for the first time in the south and women could vote and you could vote on campuses and bilanguagebilangua. it clouded the sanctions on south africa led by congressman randell o. it seems to me our struggle and their struggle coincided very well. >> reporter: we appreciate your thoughts on this day, remembering nelson mandela. thank you. >> i'll see you before the week is over. >> reporter: all right. look forward to it. let's head back to new york now and erica. >> lester, thanks. >>> we want to turn to encour e
's about civil rights. >> dave? >> this is the mood certainly in maryland and parts of the you state to be more welcoming, more open, gay marriage, the revolution and thinking on gay people and people who have other issues in that regard -- not issues, but transgenders, people like that. just another move in the direction. hyattsville today could be a lot of other cities tomorrow. >> i tend to agree. i don't think there's -- it's notable that this step has been taken. but unless it leads to a larger, more broader sort of conversation about discrimination generally, it may just be something localized. this is the kind of thing i expect out of tacoma park. surprised that hyatts vilville took -- >> i like people that call it park. >> discrimination is discrimination. >> dave mcconnell, jerry. thank you for being with us. i'm pat lawson muse. that's it for reporter's notebook. news 4 today continues. >>> we're keeping close watch on a winter storm. a live look over the potomac river right now at 6:30, courtesy of our camera at national harbor. even though it's along the water, it's one o
people wanted justice, and especially coming out at the end of the civil rights movement, a lot of people in the united states were thinking where do i put my energy now. the idea and the images that were coming out of south africa with rewards to the apartheid movement really ignited their imagination and the passion for justice. >> can't wait to see the film. >> thank you. >> thank you for being with us. the film is the 12 disciples of nelson mandela. it is about the people who were behind the scenes of the movement. here's what we can expect next in south africa. nelson mandela will be laid to rest during the official state funeral taking place in a 10 day period. tomorrow begins the memorial service, open to the public. the government are he can specking 80,000 people to be in attendance there. from wednesday to friday, international visitors will view mandelle la's remains. his body will be taken to the eastern cape where the ruling party will then pay their final respects. sunday, december 15 will bring the 10 day funeral to an end. dignitaries scheduled to attend, 71 expected to be
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